Connect with us

Latest News

FG Weakens Power Of EFCC Chairman Creates Director General In New Bill

Published

on

images 39 1 FG Weakens Power Of EFCC Chairman Creates Director General In New Bill

FG Weakens Power Of EFCC Chairman Creates Director General In New Bil


A new bill seeking to amend the Economic and Financial Crimes Act has weakened the Office of the Chairman of the EFCC and created a new position known as the Director-General of the EFCC,
has learnt.
The bill, which was obtained by this newspaper, is titled, ‘An Act to Repeal the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (Establishment) Act, 2004 (act no. 1 of 2004) and Enact the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission Act Which Establishes a More Effective and Efficient Economic and Financial Crimes Commission to Conduct Enquiries and Investigate All Economic and Financial Crimes and Related Offences and for other Related Matters.’
The bill, it was learnt, is being put together by the Attorney General, Abubakar Malami (SAN), on behalf of the Federal Government for onward transmission to the National Assembly.
The proposed law was initiated barely weeks after the suspended acting Chairman of the EFCC, Mr Ibrahim Magu, accused Malami of frustrating the anti-corruption war of the President, Major General Muhammadu Buhari (retd).
According to the proposed law, the director-general will be appointed by the President based on the recommendation of the AGF and subject to confirmation by the Senate.
The director-general, and not the chairman, will be in charge of the running of the daily affairs of the commission.
Section 8 of the bill reads in part, “There shall be for the commission, a director-general who shall be appointed by the President on the recommendation of the Attorney General subject to the confirmation by the Senate.
“Subject to the provisions of subsection (3) of this section, the Director-General shall be a retired or serving member of any government institution, including any security or law enforcement agency not below the rank of a director or its equivalent or a person from the private sector.
“A person shall not be appointed as a director-general unless he is of proven integrity and has 15 years cognate experience in security, forensic or financial crimes investigation; forensic accounting or auditing; or law practice or enforcement relating to economic and financial crimes or anti-corruption.”
The director-general, according to the proposed law, shall hold office for a period of four years subject to reappointment by the President for a further term of four years and no more.
The bill states that the chairman of the EFCC shall be the head of the EFCC board.
Other members of the board shall include the director-general, a representative of the Federal Ministry of Justice, a representative of the Central Bank of Nigeria, the Director of Nigerian Financial Intelligence Unit, two other Nigerians with 15 years cognate experience in legal, finance, banking or forensic auditing and the Director of Administration who shall be the secretary of the board.
The proposed law states that the chairman and members of the management board shall be appointed by the President, on the recommendation of the Attorney General subject to confirmation by the Senate; and for a period of four years in the first instance, renewable for another period of four years and no more.
The EFCC board headed by the chairman will be in charge of establishing policy guidelines for the commission; review and approve the strategic plans of the commission; oversee the due performance of the functions of the commission in accordance with the provisions of this Act; and do such other things which in its opinion are necessary to ensure the efficient and effective performance of the functions of the Commission under this Act.
Sunday PUNCH observed that the Secretary of the EFCC, which is a creation of Section 8 of the existing EFCC Act is not mentioned in the new bill, indicating that the position has been scrapped.
The current EFCC Secretary, Ola Olukoyede, who has also been suspended by Buhari pending investigation, is in charge of the secretariat of the commission and is responsible for the administration of the secretariat and the keeping of the books and records of the commission.
The proposed law not only restates the power of the AGF to discontinue the prosecution of criminal cases as guaranteed in Section 174 of the 1999 Constitution, it empowers the AGF to cancel the prosecutorial power of the EFCC when he sees fit. Section 45 of the new bill states that the AGF may, after notifying the EFCC, intervene in court proceedings, at first instance or on appeal, where, in the opinion of the AGF, public interest, the interest of justice and the need to prevent abuse of legal process so demand.
It further reads, “On receipt of the notice under subsection (2) of this section, the commission shall hand over to the Attorney-General the prosecution file and all documents relating to the prosecution and provide him with such other information as he may require on the matter within the time specified by him.
The commission shall furnish returns of all cases handled by it annually and in such manner and at such intervals as the Attorney-General shall direct.
“Where the commission fails to comply with the provisions of this section, the Attorney General may, subject to prevailing circumstances, revoke the power to prosecute from the commission.”
Efforts to get a reaction from the AGF’s office on Saturday proved abortive as his spokesman, Umar Gwandu, did not answer telephone calls.
However, in a statement signed by Gwandu on August 25, 2020, the AGF said the constitution already gave him enormous powers to supervise the EFCC and other agencies regardless of the EFCC Act.
The statement titled, “I don’t need more powers to supervise agencies’, read in part, “The Attorney General of the Federation does not need the tinkering of the current EFCC (Establishment) Act 2004 to enable him to regulate the institution and could, therefore not, in any way, seek to sponsor any bill for more powers to control the commission.
“It is trite to say that by virtue of the extant laws of the land as well as rules and legislation governing the conduct of the governmental operations, the Attorney General of the Federation has indisputable statutory powers to regulate the operations of the commissions without recourse to any additional legislation.
Section 43 of the EFCC Act has made it abundantly clear that ‘the Attorney General of the Federation may make rules or regulations with respect to the exercise of any of the duties, functions or powers of the Commission under this Act.”
The bill states that the director-general shall be the chief executive of the EFCC and be responsible for the day-to-day administration of the commission; the execution and implementation of the policies of the commission; the organisation, control and management of the affairs of the commission.
Other responsibilities of the director-general include the implementation of the commission’s functions, the direction, supervision and control of the employees of the commission; the maintenance of transparent accounting records in accordance with applicable laws governing statutory bodies; and ensuring that the commission is guided by the laws of Nigeria and international best practices.
CACOL kicks against bill, demands autonomy for anti-graft agency
A civil society organisation, Centre for Anti-Corruption and Open Leadership, has said that the proposed bill seeking to amend the Economic and Financial Crimes Act was in bad taste for the commission, adding that the anti-graft agency deserved to have more autonomy.
The CACOL Executive Director, Debo Adeniran, in an interview on Saturday, noted that putting the EFCC head under the AGF’s recommendation would only make the commission dance to the tune of corrupt politicians and reduce the effectiveness of the commission.


The director said, “The AGF is a politician and a political appointee who may be tempted to want to protect the interests of some of the politicians who are under EFCC’s investigations.
“The National Assembly also may want to reduce the powers of the commission because some of its members are being probed by the anti-graft agency. Instead of passing this new bill, the EFCC should be given more autonomy and made answerable to the President or at least, the Vice-President.
“We demand that the bill is dropped; it is unwarranted and it is against the spirit of progressivism and anti-corruption efforts.”

Continue Reading
Comments

Latest News

A Brief History of the Late Emir of Zazzau Alh Shehu Idris from 1936 to 2020

Published

on

38c2d3371672415fb4cd6b6b60d0a5bd 1600609977891 A Brief History of the Late Emir of Zazzau Alh Shehu Idris from 1936 to 2020

The late Emir of Zazzau His Highness Shehu Idris was born on September 20, 1936 in Zaria.

His father’s name was Malam Idris Auta, better known as Autan Sambo, and his mother’s name was Malama Aminatu Idris.

Malam Idris’ father was Muhammad Sambo who ruled as Sarkin Zazzau from 1879 to 1888, and Sambon’s father was Sarkin Zazzau Abdulkarimi who ruled from 1834 to 1846.

The late Sarkin Zazzau Shehu Idris started his religious studies in Zaria before joining the Elementary School from 1947 to 1950, during which time he lost his father when he was only 12 years old.

In 1950 he joined the Middle School in Zaria where he graduated in 1955 and then transferred to the Katsina Training College.

In 1958, he started teaching at Hurakuyi Primary School, where he taught in several schools in the Zazzau region.

He also served as the King’s Secretary in 1960, during the reign of Sarkin Zazzau Muhammadu Aminu.

In 1965. [9] to 1973 he was appointed Dan Madamin Zaria, and later he was appointed Head of Zaria.

The late Emir of Zazzau Shehu Idris became the Emir of Zazzau in 1975 after the death of the Emir of Zazzau Muhammadu Aminu.

On January 10, 2015, he organized a grand celebration to celebrate his 40th year on the throne, and on February 8, 2020, he celebrated another 45th anniversary on the throne of Zazzau.

In short he was the 18th King of Zazzau since the Jihad of Dan Fodiyo and came from the Katsina royal family, as it is known that there are three royal houses in Zazzau, the Katsina palace and the Mallawa palace and then the Barebari palace.

The emir died at the age of 84 on Sunday, September 20, 2020 at about 11am at the 44 Army Barack Hospital in Kaduna.

Continue Reading

Politics

‘Obaseki’s Victory Shows Egocentric Politicking Can Be Defeated’ – Oyegun

Published

on

images 80 2 'Obaseki’s Victory Shows Egocentric Politicking Can Be Defeated' - Oyegun

A former National chairman of the All Progressives Congress (APC), Chief John Odigie-Oyegun, has congratulated Edo State Governor, Mr. Godwin Obaseki, on his re-election.
Oyegun, in a statement on Tuesday, noted that egocentric politicking could be overcome.
“Please accept my deepest congratulations, Mr. Governor on your re-election as Governor of our great Edo State.
“You and your exemplary Deputy have shown that with good work and principled leadership, the ills of overbearing and egocentric politicking in our nation can be overcome.”
He noted: “Your very significant victory marks a watershed in Edo and indeed Nigerian politics and so places additional responsibilities on your shoulders.”
“I wish you and your Deputy four more years of inspired and productive leadership of our people who have reposed so much confidence in you,” Odigie-Oyegun added.

Continue Reading

Breaking News

FG , States , LGs Share N682 .060 Billion As Allocation For August , 2020

Published

on

images 79 2 FG , States , LGs Share N682 .060 Billion As Allocation For August , 2020

FG, States, LGs Share N682.060bn As Allocation For August, 2020
The Federation Accounts Allocation Committee (FAAC) has shared a total of N682.060 billion August 2020 federation account revenue to the Federal, States and Local Government Councils and agencies.
This was made known after the monthly Federation Account Allocation Committee (FAAC) meeting for September 2020 held through virtual conferencing; chaired by Dr. Mahmud Isa-Dutse, Permanent Secretary, Federal Ministry of Finance.
The gross statutory revenue of N531.830 billion was received for the month of August 2020. This was lower than the N543.788 billion received in the previous month by N11.958 billion.
The gross revenue available from the Value Added Tax (VAT) was N150.230 billion as against N132.619 billion available in the previous month, resulting in an increase of N17.611 billion.
A communiqué issued by the Federation Account Allocation Committee (FAAC) indicated that from the total distributable revenue of N682.060 billion; the Federal Government received N272.905 billion, the State Governments received N197.648 billion and the Local Government Councils received N147.422 billion.
The Oil Producing States received N30.881 billion as 13% derivation revenue, while cost of revenue collection and transfers collectively had allocation of N33.205 billion.
The Federal Government received N251.948 billion from the gross statutory revenue of N531.830 billion; the State Governments received N 127.791 billion and the Local Government Councils received N98.522 billion.
N30.881 billion was given to the relevant States as 13% derivation revenue and N22.689 billion was the collective total for cost of revenue collection, transfers and refund to agencies.
The Federal Government received N20.957 billion from the Value Added Tax (VAT) revenue of N150.230 billion. The State Governments received N69.857billion; the Local Government Councils received N48.900 billion, while cost of revenue collection and transfers collectively had allocation of N10.516 billion.
The Communiqué stated that for the month of August 2020, Oil and Gas Royalty, Companies Income Tax (CIT), Import and Excise Duty and Value Added Tax (VAT) increased considerably, while Petroleum Profit Tax (PPT) decreased significantly.
The balance in the Excess Crude Account (ECA) as at 17th September, 2020 was $72.409 million.

Continue Reading

Trending